Hearst Museum Portal

Container, netsuke

Museum number:
9-12548a,b
Permalink:
ark:/21549/hm210912548a@2cb
Alternate number:
102? (previous number) and 3902 (previous number (Design Dept.))
Accession number:
Acc.3032
Object count:
6
Description:
Inro and Netsuke: the inro (a) is a lacquer case of five nesting sections, with raised cord guides. Decoration in gold sprinkled lacquer and black unpolished lacquer (hana-nuri). One side shows two thatched buildings depicted in light sprinkled gold on the black surface, with heavier gold lines for detail. Stream in foreground, rock with small rectabgles of gold foil inlay (okibarame), and willow trees, in slight relief: (hira-maki-e). - in the background. Reverse side shows stream, black pine trees, and mountains in the background. Much of the ground has the inlaid rectabgles of gold. Plain surfaces in dull even sprinkled gold, (fundame). Interior: Nashiji = coarse sprinkles of gold on black ground covered by red tinted transparent lacquer. (b) Netsuke: wood carving representing abalone with two small shells on top forming cord hole. Signature on one side. L. (a) 8cm.; (b) 4.3cm.
Donor:
Design Department (UC Berkeley)
Collection place:
Japan
Verbatim coll. place:
Japan
Culture or time period:
Japanese
Collector:
Albert M. Bender
Collection date:
before 1933
Materials:
Gold (metal), Silk, and Wood (plant material)
Inscription:
(b) Signature on one side.
Object type:
ethnography
Function:
2.2 Personal Adornments and Accoutrements
Accession date:
1974
Context of use:
The inro was originally used for holding the seals used for officiating signatures. It was later adapted for carrying various articles incl. medicines, and herbs, and became subject to elaborate decoration by the merchant and warrior classes for personal adornment. To wear it, the netsuke was thrust through the sash of the kimono for the support of the inro. The ojime functioned to keep the compartments closed by tightening the cords.
Department:
Cat. 9 - Asia (incl. Russia east of Urals)
Dimensions:
b— length 4.3 centimeters and a— length 8 centimeters
Legacy documentation: