Hearst Museum Portal

Pipe

Museum number:
2-168
Permalink:
ark:/21549/hm21020000168
Accession number:
Acc.46
Object count:
1
Description:
Walrus tusk with engraved and darkened drawings; 2 men with rifles shooting a bear, the Pal-rai-yuk monster pursuing man in kayak and fish, etc. on one side; drying racks, men in umiak with trailing fish and net, etc. on other side.
Donor:
Phoebe Apperson Hearst
Collection place:
Lower Yukon, Yukon, Yukon-Koyukuk Borough
Verbatim coll. place:
Alaska; Lower Yukon
Culture or time period:
Alaskan Eskimo
Collector:
Charles L. Hall
Collection date:
ca. 1895
Taxon:
Odobenus rosmarus
Object type:
ethnography
Accession date:
August 12, 1902
Context of use:
Tobacco pipe.
Department:
Cat. 2 - North America (except Mexico and Central America)
Dimensions:
length 45.1 centimeters
Comment:
Published: Ray, Eskimo Art (1977), fig. 243. References: Nelson pp. 444-45. "Ray (1977): "Two sides of a pipe showing imaginative relationships between folklore and the reality of living off the land...Collected by Charles L. Hall between 1894 and 1901 in the Saint Michael area. This pipe was probably made by the same man who engraved the tusk in figures 247 and 248. The heavy style of depicting density, color, and texture simulates painting since the combination of irregular knife cuts and the application of the darkening substance provide shadings not ordinarily found in engravings of that time, which were either crosshatching (figs. 246, 249, 250) or a slanting gash with white spaces (fig. 242), also seen in those copied from printed illustrations (figs. 251, 253, 254, 258, 260, 261, 263-67). The two wrestling bears and the bear being shot probably represent specific stories or folk tales. The legendary creature, palraiyuk, at the end of one tusk appears to be chasing fish into a trap. The name was first recorded by Nelson (1899, pp. 444-45)."
Images:
Legacy documentation: