Hearst Museum Portal

Netsuke

Museum number:
9-7934
Permalink:
ark:/21549/hm21090007934
Alternate number:
4-74 (original number)
Accession number:
Acc.2384
Object count:
1
Description:
Netsuke in old brown wood-- a man, with a fish basket, a fisherman's straight, rustic rod, and fisherman's hat on his back, and a surprisingly flat head. Depiction of Chang-tzu-yo called by the Japanese Toikobo.
Donor:
Estate of Geraldine C. and Kernan Robson
Collection place:
Japan
Culture or time period:
Japanese
Collector:
Geraldine C. Robson
Collection date:
before 1940
Materials:
Ivory (material)
Person depicted:
Toikobo
Object type:
ethnography
Function:
2.2 Personal Adornments and Accoutrements
Accession date:
1968
Context of use:
Toggle to be attached to the end of a cord and thrust through the sash of a kimono for the support of a purse, pouch or lacquer box.
Department:
Cat. 9 - Asia (incl. Russia east of Urals)
Dimensions:
height 3.2 centimeters
Comment:
Per Robeson Accession File: Netsuke in old brown wood-- a man, with a fish basket, a fisherman's straight, rustic rod, and fisherman's hat on his back, and a surprisingly flat head. Chang-tzu-yo called by the Japanese Toikobo. He went fishing to be rid of the wrangling of a discontented wife, and to muse upon "astronomy, geography, and the art of warfare." He fished with a straight pin, and no bait. The fish thought so highly of him that they managed to hold on to this, and be caught. He looked so wise, over this pursuit, that the Empoeror accorsted him one day, and requested him to become his prime minister. After years at court, he returned filled with honors and riches. and was accosted by his wife and her lover. The wife begged him to take her back. For answer [sic], he took a glass of water and spilled the contents, telling her that it would be easier to assemble the drops than to return to her. The wife hanged herself by the wayside.
Legacy documentation: