Hearst Museum Portal

Netsuke

Museum number:
9-7538
Permalink:
ark:/21549/hm21090007538
Alternate number:
3-224 (original number), 4-391 (original number), and 5-368 (original number)
Accession number:
Acc.2384
Object count:
2
Description:
Netsuke in double manju (flat cake, bun) form, made of ivory. Depicts Sennin Kohaku, riding a crane, which is a symbol of longevity. The pine trees on the reverse also signify longevity. Signature is Kōsai, which gives this object a late date as the artist was known to be creating netsuke until 1877.
Donor:
Estate of Geraldine C. and Kernan Robson
Collection place:
Japan
Culture or time period:
Edo period (1603-1868) and Meiji era (1868-1912)
Maker or artist:
Kōsai
Collector:
Geraldine C. Robson
Collection date:
before 1940
Materials:
Ivory (material)
Person depicted:
Sennin Kohaku
Object type:
ethnography
Function:
2.2 Personal Adornments and Accoutrements
Production date:
1800-1877
Accession date:
1968
Context of use:
Toggle to be attached to the end of a cord and thrust through the sash of a kimono for the support of a purse, pouch or lacquer box.
Department:
Cat. 9 - Asia (incl. Russia east of Urals)
Dimensions:
height 4.4 centimeters
Comment:
Per Robeson Accession: Manju, a form of Netsuke, shaped like a tea biscuit. That is to say, round and somewhat thick. This manju, in ivory with subject engraved in brown, of a man riding on a crane with a Sho (a wind instrument) with a ribbon attached. Depicts Oshikio, a Chinese Sennin, who lived in Chou Dynasty circa 570 BC. He was fond of playing the Sho to the tune of the phoenix. He was taken by a fairy, to the summit of a mountain. After 30 years, he met a man, whom he told to inform his family that he would appear to them on the summit of Mt. Ko, where they found hum on the appointed day, riding on a white crane. He left a prescription for an elixir whose main ingredient was chrysanthemum shoots, gathered :on the day of the Tiger"in the third month. See Joly, Oshikio, under "Rishis.
Legacy documentation: