Hearst Museum Portal

Container, netsuke and bead

Museum number:
9-12543a-c
Permalink:
ark:/21549/hm210912543a@2dc
Alternate number:
3256 (previous number (Albert Bender’s number)) and 3897 (previous number (Design Dept.))
Accession number:
Acc.3032
Object count:
5
Description:
Inro, netsuke, and ojime: The inro (a), wood, is a thin rectangular box w/lid composed of dark wood on wide sides, and lighter wood attached at narrow sides which is rounded & w/ holes for cords. Thin inner box lining, which lid fits over. Metal decor. attached to one side: bearded man w/ hat mounted backwards on horse, that stands on dull encrusted material. Gold detail. Nr. the top is a mountain in same material. Reverse side has three cloisonne 'blossom' medallions. (b) netsuke is a stump of wood w/ bark remaining and 5 sawed off points. Brown cord runs thru drilled hole. Ojime (c) is a dull yellow brown shell. (A)L. 8.2cm., W. 7.5cm. (b) max L. 6cm.; (c) L. 1.5 cm.
Donor:
Design Department (UC Berkeley)
Collection place:
Japan
Verbatim coll. place:
Japan
Culture or time period:
Japanese
Collector:
Albert M. Bender
Collection date:
before 1933
Materials:
Metal and Wood (plant material)
Object type:
ethnography
Function:
2.2 Personal Adornments and Accoutrements
Accession date:
1974
Context of use:
The inro is a multi-pupose [purpose] article used originally for containing seals used in officiating signatures. They were later adapted for carrying various personal articles and toiletries incl. medicines and herbs. For lack of a pocket, the netsuke was thrust through the sash of the kimono for the support of the inro. The ojime kept the compartments closed by tightening the cords.
Department:
Cat. 9 - Asia (incl. Russia east of Urals)
Dimensions:
b: max— length 6 centimeters, a— width 7.5 centimeters, a— length 8.2 centimeters, and c— length 1.5 centimeters
Legacy documentation: